The Pet Cancer Vet™

On "The Pet Cancer Vet" Tracie and Dr. Sue take per-arranged calls from pet owners with a dog or cat" with cancer, in order to give them and other listeners information, support and hope. Dr. Sue’s philosophy is that cancer is a treatable disease and her motto is “Live longer, live well.” Sue supports an integrative approach to radiation, chemotherapy and surgery with the addition of supplements and nutritional support.  Also known as Dr Sue Cancer Vet®, Dr. Sue is the co-author of the Second Edition of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide, which is a best-selling book in small animal health for the last several years. Dr. Sue Ettinger is a practicing veterinary cancer specialist, international speaker, book author, and is currently the head of the Oncology Department at the Animal Specialty & Emergency Center in the Hudson Valley, NY.  She is one of approximately 400 board-certified specialists in medical oncology in North America. She received her veterinary training at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. She completed her residency in medical oncology at the Animal Medical Center in NYC in 2003. She has recently won the Woof Pack Award for Exceptional Doctor Performance and the Public Relations Achievement Award in the Northeast specialty region. Hosted by Tracie Hotchner, Susan Ettinger, DVM, ACVIM (Oncology)

Hosted by Tracie Hotchner, Susan Ettinger, DVM, ACVIM (Oncology)


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Early Spaying and Cancer Risk

Pet Cancer Vet (04-23-2018) #2070: Angela calls from Indianapolis — she is a RVT (registered veterinary technician) working toward a specialty in oncology, and just lost her 135 lb Great Dane, Sydney, to osteosarcoma. She feels terrible guilt that she had her dog spayed early (before 6 months), not knowing that this could increase her risk for cancer. Dr. Sue and Tracie try to put her mind to rest because none of us “can know what we don’t know”! And her desire to educate others about this issue is what is motivating her to speak up. Dr. Sue explains that breed is not as correlated with increased cancer risk as is the height and weight of a dog.